Econlinks: The applied maths edition

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Econlinks: On crises. And opportunities

  • Crises and opportunities in Balkan science policy (start, more). A word of caution for my Romanian pals, among whom a new risk of self-denying optimism– expected to turn into the usual complacency– appears contagious: con calma, this is at best a mediocre start (though, granted, a start it is).
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Econlinks: Kamelåså et al

  • Before I come up with my Econ Nobel forecast — a week to go, stay tuned– let us take a look to the 2010 Nobel Ig prizes related to Economics. The Economics Ig Nobel itself is perhaps not very unexpected this year–though not very creative either (I wonder whether Oliver Stone is behind this too; his latest movie gets pretty mediocre reviews– IMDb, RottenTomatoes— despite all the hype).
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Weekend econlinks: The quest for perfection

  • Gelman writes a useful overview on causality and statistical learning (caveat lector: I have only read through Angrist and Pischke’s book, among the three Gelman mentiones; that one is very well written, but aimed at junior graduate students at best: hence, the book’s tag “an empiricist’s companion” is overselling it; and that has nothing to do with Josh Angrist kindly “advising” me to change my PhD topic/focus, sometime in my beginning graduate years, because ‘nobody serious would be interested in structural modelling’ :-)).
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Sunday night econlinks

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Sunday econlinks

  • One of the reasons I just love reading Landsburg: he is acid and funny. Here’s something that hopefully will open a longer exchange between him and Krugman: I really think Steve Landsburg is the proper counterpart to Paul Krugman in any debate (NB: Mankiw is great, but too serious and not engaging–understandably– enough in the type of debate Krugman seems to love).
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Weekend Econlinks

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