What I have been reading

A couple of books I have read within the past few weeks, most of them on my Kindle 3G device(*):
Scott Berkun’s “Confessions of a Public Speaker” (get the Kindle edition): the author is a professional speaker, in front of audiences large and small, hence he has got some very helpful tips for anyone who ever needs to engage in public speaking, mostly drawn from his own experiences.  → Read more

Econlinks: Of (visual) art, old and new

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Econlinks: On crises. And opportunities

  • Crises and opportunities in Balkan science policy (start, more). A word of caution for my Romanian pals, among whom a new risk of self-denying optimism– expected to turn into the usual complacency– appears contagious: con calma, this is at best a mediocre start (though, granted, a start it is).
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Theory and practice, in theory and in practice

[…]

The playful mantras of our adolescence have become a way of life for later generations. At least in the ’60s we knew, whatever we said, that sex was about…sex. All the same, what followed is our fault. We—the left, academics, teachers—have abandoned politics to those for whom actual power is far more interesting than its metaphorical implications.

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Indignation. Leila. Zigeunerweisen. Leila

For some reason I (once in a while) remember something Supachai Panichpakdi, then-WTO boss, said at a keynote speach in a Rotterdam conference celebrating 100 years since the birth of Jan Tinbergen (earlier on this blog, in Romanian): namely that we, then-PhD students in Economics, should stop reading [all sorts of books, papers etc.] and start writing immediately [papers, books, anything?], without wasting any further time (footnote here: — which I do not know if Blogger can handle– next to that, Dr.  → Read more

Sunday econlinks

  • An interesting debate in the latest issue of Capitalism and Society on the current status of Economics and other Social Sciences, worth reading especially for the two comments to the leading article on the theme. Unfortunately, Jon Elster, in his “Excessive Ambitions“, otherwise a welcome (and relatively informed) outsider’s critique, does not manage to rise up to his declared ambitions of debunking the status quo / portraying “the persistence in the economic profession and elsewhere of these useless or harmful models“, and eventually falls easy prey to his commenters: Pierre-André Chiappori (who, very elegantly, but unmistakenly, tackles most of the points raised by Elster in his criticism of economic theory and testing its predictions) and respectively, David Hendry (who virtually destroys Elster’s line of reasoning and conclusions on empirical modelling in Economics).
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Sunday night econlinks

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