US Government shutdown menorah

…and some of us were worried about Portugal

At midnight, if the President and Congress have not reached an agreement on funding measures, the U.S. government will shutdown, referred to as a funding gap, until an agreement is reached to either extend a temporary funding measure or a final budget deal is made.
  → Read more

Econlinks: The applied maths edition

  → Read more

Best LEED for developing countries

Word goes that Portugal is likely to soon join the category of developing countries (as you might have heard). However, before you start sobbing, consider this: not all is doom. In fact, this could well be heaven for economists working with the famous Quadros de Pessoal longitudinal “linked employer-employee data” (LEED), and, eventually– as I will try to convince you– it would materialize in tremendous success in improving the state of the whole world.  → Read more

What I have been reading

A couple of books I have read within the past few weeks, most of them on my Kindle 3G device(*):
Scott Berkun’s “Confessions of a Public Speaker” (get the Kindle edition): the author is a professional speaker, in front of audiences large and small, hence he has got some very helpful tips for anyone who ever needs to engage in public speaking, mostly drawn from his own experiences.  → Read more

Econlinks: The Freudian interlude

  • Seinfeld’s spongeworthy Elaine, an unusual, limited-purpose –but very thorough– option theory application, by the one and only Avinash Dixit.
  •  All passé now, but hopefully you did pick your favorite Cupid
  • New academic econ world order… but only if you fail to control for the quality of the journals  those papers are published in (my conjecture is that if you take only the top 5-10 journals, the US-EU average gap actually widened).
  → Read more

Grand challenges for social, behavioural and economic sciences

What this is about: SBE 2020.
244 white papers in SBE available on the NSF site.
The white papers in Economics. Note that some of these papers are not available on the NSF site as they were submitted after their deadline, hence this is not really a subset of the earlier 244; moreover, more might be added at this link (I would not be surprised to count ultimately more here than the total number of papers on the NSF site, after all Econ work is never overlast bullet point).  → Read more

Econlinks: In degrees of awesomeness

  • Greg Mankiw seems to be arguing for a European-type separate master + PhD graduate Econ program– such as those at LSE, Oxford, Pompeu Fabra, Tinbergen Institute, and (I guess) the newish Paris School of Economics entity– rather than the US-type graduate PhD package, which comes with a (usually elective) master on the way (that is somewhat ironic, given the desire of the typical high-aspiring European place to ultimately emulate the US top places).
  → Read more

George Stigler could do anything–anything but be boring

 […] I must out of courtesy and caution reserve judgment on any laws that Professor Stigler may unveil. For, as I learned when our friendship began long ago, George Stigler can do anything– anything but be boring.

-Paul Samuelson-
Here’s the Sunday read I recommend to you: a great 1963 dialogue on the “proper economic role of the state” between two intellectual giants, George Stigler(*, **) and Paul Samuelson.  → Read more

Econlinks: On crises. And opportunities

  • Crises and opportunities in Balkan science policy (start, more). A word of caution for my Romanian pals, among whom a new risk of self-denying optimism– expected to turn into the usual complacency– appears contagious: con calma, this is at best a mediocre start (though, granted, a start it is).
  → Read more